Noncommunicable Diseases Progress Monitor 2017

Since 2011, countries around the world have made many commitments to prevent and manage NCDs. However progress has been slow and inconsistent.

To measure progress and promote accountability, the WHO defined 10 national progress indicators and requested updates from Member States on their progress towards achieving these indicators. Their responses were then used to produce a report -  Noncommunicable Diseases Progress Monitor 2017.

The 10 national indicators are:

  1.   Member State has set time-bound national targets based on WHO guidance
  2.   Member State has a functioning system for generating reliable cause-specific mortality data on a routine basis
  3.   Member State has a STEPs survey or a comprehensive health examination survey every 5 years
  4.   Member State has an operational multisectoral national strategy/action plan that integrates the major NCDs and their shared risk factors
  5.   Member State has implemented the following 5 demand-reduction measures of the WHO FCTC at the highest level of achievement
    1. Reduce affordability by increasing excise taxes and prices on tobacco products
    2. Eliminate exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke in all indoor workplaces, public places and public transport
    3. Implement plain/standardised packaging and/or large graphic health warnings on all tobacco packages
    4. Enact and enforce comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship
    5. Implement effective mass media campaigns that educate the public about the harms of smoking/tobacco use and second hand smoke
  6.  Member State has implemented, as appropriate according to national circumstances, the following 3 measures to reduce the harmful use of alcohol, as per the WHO Global Strategy to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol
    1. Enact and enforce restrictions on the physical availability of retailed alcohol (via reduced hour of sale)
    2. Enact and enforce bans or comprehensive restrictions on exposure to alcohol advertising
    3. Increase excise taxes on alcoholic beverages
  7.  Member State has implemented the following 4 measures to reduce unhealthy diets
    1. Adopt national policies to reduce population salt/sodium consumption
    2. Adopt national policies that limit saturated fatty acids and virtually eliminate industrially produced trans fatty acids in the food supply
    3. WHO set of recommendations on marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children
    4. Legislation/regulations fully implementing the International Code of marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes
  8.  Member State has implemented at least one recent national public awareness and motivational communication for physical activity, including mass media campaigns for physical activity behavioural change
  9.  Member State has evidence-based national guidelines/protocols/standards for the management of major NCDs through a primary care approach, recognised/approved by government or competent authorities
  10.  Member State has provision of drug therapy, including glycaemic control, and counselling for eligible persons at high risk to prevent heart attacks and strokes, with emphasis on the primary care level

 

Indicator 7a – Member state has adopted national policies to reduce population salt/sodium consumption

The definition of this indicator is given as: Country has implemented national policies to reduce population salt/sodium consumption, including reformulation of food products; establishment of a supportive environment in public institutions to enable lower sodium options to be provided; behaviour change communication and mass media campaigns; and front-of-pack labelling.

This indicator is considered fully achieved if the country responds “Yes” to the question “Is your country implementing any policies to reduce population salt consumption?” and to the sub questions “Are these targeted at: product reformulation by industry across the food supply; regulation of salt content of food; public awareness programme; nutrition labelling?". Country must also provide the needed supporting documentation.

This indicator is considered partially achieved if the country responds “Yes” to the question “Is your country implementing any policies to reduce population salt consumption?”, and “Yes” to at least one of the four sub questions “Are these targeted at: product reformulation by industry across the food supply; regulation of salt content of food; public awareness programme; nutrition labelling?”.

Of the 194 Member States, 51 (26%) responded that they had ‘Fully Achieved’ indicator 7a:

AlgeriaIranPortugal
ArgentinaIrelandRepublic of Korea
AzerbaijanIsraelSaudi Arabia
BhutanItalySingapore
BrazilJamaicaSlovenia
BulgariaJordanSouth Africa
CanadaKyrgyzstanSpain
Central African RepublicLesothoSweden
ChileLithuaniaTajikstan
ChinaMalaysiaThailand
Costa RicaMaliTunisia
CroatiaMaltaTurkey
DenmarkMongoliaTurkmenistan
EstoniaMoroccoUnited Arab Emirates
FinlandNetherlandsUK
FranceNorwayUSA
GreeceOmanUzbekistan

34 Member States responded that they had 'Partially Achieved' the indicator. However, 51% (98) of Member States stated that they have 'Not Achieved' the indicator, which clearly demonstrates the lack of progress made towards reducing population salt intake by 30% by 2025, with the ultimate aim of achieving an intake of 5g/day.